Now Playing Tracks

laboratoryequipment:

Study Says Vitamin D Doesn’t Affect Weight Loss

A Curtin Univ. study has cast doubt on claims vitamin D helps with fat loss after a meta-analysis of 12 high-quality vitamin D randomized control trials showed it had little impact on adiposity or obesity measures.

The School of Public Health study reviewed randomized controlled trials to see whether supplementation with vitamin D without caloric restriction influenced body weight and composition.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/study-casts-doubt-claims-vitamin-helps-fat-loss

laboratoryequipment:

Ginseng Can Treat, Prevent Flu, Respiratory Virus

Ginseng can help treat and prevent influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a respiratory virus that infects the lungs and breathing passages, according to research findings by a scientist in Georgia State Univ.’s new Institute for Biomedical Sciences.

In a recent issue of Nutrients and an upcoming publication of the International Journal of Molecular Medicine, Sang-Moo Kang reports the beneficial effects of ginseng, a well-known herbal medicine, on human health.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/ginseng-can-treat-prevent-flu-respiratory-virus

laboratoryequipment:

Pain Relievers May Help, not Hurt, Heart

Nonsteroidal antinflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) that block an enzyme called COX-2 relieve pain and inflammation but can cause heart attacks, stroke, heart failure and even sudden cardiac death. This has prompted a decade-plus search for safer, but still effective, alternatives to these commonly prescribed, pain-relieving drugs.

Building on previous work that showed that deleting an enzyme in the COX-2 pathway in a mouse model of heart disease slowed the development of atherosclerosis, a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the Univ. of Pennsylvania has now extended this observation by clarifying that the consequence of deleting the enzyme mPEGS-1 differs, depending on the cell type in which it is taken away.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/pain-relievers-may-help-not-hurt-heart

23pairsofchromosomes:

Earth Day

Today, more than half of the world’s population lives in cities. As the urban population grows and the effects of climate change worsen, our cities have to evolve.

It’s time for us to invest in efficiency and renewable energy, rebuild our cities and towns, and begin to solve the climate crisis. Over the next two years, with a focus on Earth Day 2014, the Green Cities campaign will mobilize a global movement to accelerate this transition. Join us in calling for a new era of green cities. 

To learn more, visit the Earth Day website.

emir-dynamite:

last-snowfall:

el-fridlo:

Sergeant Stubby, so named for his lack of a tail, was a stray pitbull found wandering Yale campus by some soldiers there during drill.

"He learned the bugle calls, the drills, and even a modified dog salute as he put his right paw on his right eyebrow when a salute was executed by his fellow soldiers."

He was smuggled into WW1 by a soldier, and allowed to stay when he saluted the man who would later become his commanding officer.

He was sent to the trenches where he was under constant enemy fire for over a month. He was wounded in the leg by a German hand grenade, sent to a hospital to convalesce, then returned to the front lines…

After being wounded in a gas attack, Stubby developed such a sensitivity that he would run and bark and alert the other soldiers of incoming gas attacks AND artillery attacks precious seconds before they occurred, saving countless lives. A canine early warming system.

He would go into no man’s land, find wounded men, shouting in English, And stay with them, barking, until medics arrived.

He once captured a German spy.
The spy, mapping out Allied trenches, tried to call to Stubby, but Stubby got aggressive and then chased down and attacked the spy when he attempted to flee, allowing Allied soldiers to capture him.

For this he was awarded the rank of Sergeant- the first dog to do so.

After helping the Allies retake Château-Thierry in France, Sergeant Stubby was sewn a uniform by the women of the town, on which to wear his many medals.

He went on to meet multiple Presidents, dignitaries and ambassadors and become the mascot of Georgetown University football.

There is nothing about this that is not magical.

A very good dog.

neurosciencestuff:

Cognitive scientists use ‘I spy’ to show spoken language helps direct children’s eyes
In a new study, Indiana University cognitive scientists Catarina Vales and Linda Smith demonstrate that children spot objects more quickly when prompted by words than if they are only prompted by images.
Language, the study suggests, is transformative: More so than images, spoken language taps into children’s cognitive system, enhancing their ability to learn and to navigate cluttered environments. As such the study, published last week in the journal Developmental Science, opens up new avenues for research into the way language might shape the course of developmental disabilities such as ADHD, difficulties with school, and other attention-related problems.
In the experiment, children played a series of “I spy” games, widely used to study attention and memory in adults. Asked to look for one image in a crowded scene on a computer screen, the children were shown a picture of the object they needed to find — a bed, for example, hidden in a group of couches.
"If the name of the target object was also said, the children were much faster at finding it and less distracted by the other objects in the scene," said Vales, a graduate student in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.
"What we’ve shown is that in 3-year-old children, words activate memories that then rapidly deploy attention and lead children to find the relevant object in a cluttered array," said Smith, Chancellor’s Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. "Words call up an idea that is more robust than an image and to which we more rapidly respond. Words have a way of calling up what you know that filters the environment for you.”
The study, she said , “is the first clear demonstration of the impact of words on the way children navigate the visual world and is a first step toward understanding the way language influences visual attention, raising new testable hypotheses about the process.”
Vales said the use of language can change how people inspect the world around them.
"We also know that language will change the way people perform in a lot of different laboratory tasks," she said. "And if you have a child with ADHD who has a hard time focusing, one of the things parents are told to do is to use words to walk the child through what she needs to do. So there is this notion that words change cognition. The question is ‘how?’"
Vales said their research results “begin to tell us precisely how words help, the kinds of cognitive processes words tap into to change how children behave. For instance, the difference between search times, with and without naming the target object, indicate a key role for a kind of brief visual memory known as working memory, that helps us remember what we just saw as we look to something new. Words put ideas in working memory faster than images.”
For this reason, language may play an important role in a number of developmental disabilities.
"Limitations in working memory have been implicated in almost every developmental disability, especially those concerned with language, reading and negative outcomes in school," Smith said. "These results also suggest the culprit for these difficulties may be language in addition to working memory.
"This study changes the causal arrow a little bit. People have thought that children have difficulty with language because they don’t have enough working memory to learn language. This turns it around because it suggests that language may also make working memory more effective."
How does this matter to child development?
"Children learn in the real world, and the real world is a cluttered place," Smith said. "If you don’t know where to look, chances are you don’t learn anything. The words you know are a driving force behind attention. People have not thought about it as important or pervasive, but once children acquire language, it changes everything about their cognitive system."
"Our results suggest that language has huge effects, not just on talking, but on attention — which can determine how children learn, how much they learn and how well they learn," Vales said.
Zoom Info
Camera
Nikon COOLPIX L22
ISO
400
Aperture
f/3.1
Exposure
1/40th
Focal Length
6mm

neurosciencestuff:

Cognitive scientists use ‘I spy’ to show spoken language helps direct children’s eyes

In a new study, Indiana University cognitive scientists Catarina Vales and Linda Smith demonstrate that children spot objects more quickly when prompted by words than if they are only prompted by images.

Language, the study suggests, is transformative: More so than images, spoken language taps into children’s cognitive system, enhancing their ability to learn and to navigate cluttered environments. As such the study, published last week in the journal Developmental Science, opens up new avenues for research into the way language might shape the course of developmental disabilities such as ADHD, difficulties with school, and other attention-related problems.

In the experiment, children played a series of “I spy” games, widely used to study attention and memory in adults. Asked to look for one image in a crowded scene on a computer screen, the children were shown a picture of the object they needed to find — a bed, for example, hidden in a group of couches.

"If the name of the target object was also said, the children were much faster at finding it and less distracted by the other objects in the scene," said Vales, a graduate student in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences.

"What we’ve shown is that in 3-year-old children, words activate memories that then rapidly deploy attention and lead children to find the relevant object in a cluttered array," said Smith, Chancellor’s Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. "Words call up an idea that is more robust than an image and to which we more rapidly respond. Words have a way of calling up what you know that filters the environment for you.”

The study, she said , “is the first clear demonstration of the impact of words on the way children navigate the visual world and is a first step toward understanding the way language influences visual attention, raising new testable hypotheses about the process.”

Vales said the use of language can change how people inspect the world around them.

"We also know that language will change the way people perform in a lot of different laboratory tasks," she said. "And if you have a child with ADHD who has a hard time focusing, one of the things parents are told to do is to use words to walk the child through what she needs to do. So there is this notion that words change cognition. The question is ‘how?’"

Vales said their research results “begin to tell us precisely how words help, the kinds of cognitive processes words tap into to change how children behave. For instance, the difference between search times, with and without naming the target object, indicate a key role for a kind of brief visual memory known as working memory, that helps us remember what we just saw as we look to something new. Words put ideas in working memory faster than images.”

For this reason, language may play an important role in a number of developmental disabilities.

"Limitations in working memory have been implicated in almost every developmental disability, especially those concerned with language, reading and negative outcomes in school," Smith said. "These results also suggest the culprit for these difficulties may be language in addition to working memory.

"This study changes the causal arrow a little bit. People have thought that children have difficulty with language because they don’t have enough working memory to learn language. This turns it around because it suggests that language may also make working memory more effective."

How does this matter to child development?

"Children learn in the real world, and the real world is a cluttered place," Smith said. "If you don’t know where to look, chances are you don’t learn anything. The words you know are a driving force behind attention. People have not thought about it as important or pervasive, but once children acquire language, it changes everything about their cognitive system."

"Our results suggest that language has huge effects, not just on talking, but on attention — which can determine how children learn, how much they learn and how well they learn," Vales said.

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union